Museum Review – Freedom House Museum

Entries from 2/17/18 Instagram Post. check it out & Follow: Instagram.com/TheMergingLanesProject

Things to do (Virginia) Freedom House Museum || There were about 30 visitors waiting for the 2:30 pm tour. I lucked up, the family standing in line ahead of me had an extra ticket (Thanks Tahima).

Apparently there is quite a demand to tour this particular museum. As one resident shared, “I live in Alexandria and the museum is never open.” An emailed response that I received earlier this week stated the museum will provide guided tours on Saturdays only, from now through to the end of February.

Public History is an interdisciplinary practice. Pictured is an exhibit panel which details University of the District of Columbia’s (UDC) School of Architecture’s contribution to the Freedom House Museum. UDC is an HBCU located in Washington DC. Students were responsible for recreating the slave pen model pictured in the 2nd photo.

Pictured is F. Elliott and another museum goer. Here, Elliott shares that he too picked cotton. In the 60s, in North Carolina he helped his mother perform the task. During that time it was his mother’s primary source of income. He eventually migrated to Maryland and is now a public school teacher. F. Elliott is in the process of writing a book titled “A Way Out” which will detail his days working in North Carolina’s cotton fields, to his time as an educator.

This is an example of the opportunity that museum’s provide for visitors to engage in discourse with various demographics. It also allows for one to identify personal connections to the history that has been interpreted

The Freedom House Museum made use of various mediums to engage visitors. Some of which include video displays, interpretive panels and artifacts. Pictured are a few artifacts currently on display. One of which is a stereoscope. The stereoscope was used as a form of entertainment in the early 19th century. It was also a means to distribute and display images captured in places across the nation. The slides displayed in pictures 2 and 3 are described as a “Georgia Cotton Field”

Archeologist, Pam Cressey shared that the state of Virginia requires that an archaeological dig is performed anytime any major infrastructure changes are made to a property. She assisted with the archaeological dig performed at The Freedom House Museum. When asked if the Civil war artifacts on display had been recovered from that dig she expressed that she wasn’t entirely sure but there is a possibility that they had been.

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