National Museum of African American History and Culture Announces “Walk-Up Weekdays” January & February

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National Museum of African American History and Culture Announces 
Walk-Up Weekdays in January and February

            The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture has announced Walk-Up Weekdays in January and February. Individuals may enter the museum on a first-come, first-served basis Monday through Friday for the months of January and February 2019. Timed-entry passes for individuals will only be required on Saturdays and Sundays. Walk-up entry on weekdays is a as part of a continuing pilot to provide visitors unfettered access to the museum.

On Wednesday, Nov. 7, at 9 a.m. ET, the museum will distribute advance timed-entry passes for Saturdays and Sundays Feb. 2 and 3, 9 and 10, 16 and 17 and 23 and 24. Walk-Up Weekdays will continue in February 2019 and timed passes will not be distributed for weekdays (Mondays–Fridays). Individuals may enter the museum on a first-come, first-served basis on weekdays in February. Same-day online and walk-up passes will not be available nor necessary on weekdays in February. Group passes are required every day for groups of 10 or more. Timed passes for January have already been distributed and will be required only on Saturdays and Sundays in January.

Timed passes for every day in November and December have already been distributed. The options for visitors are same-day online passes and walk-up passes that will be available most afternoons in November and December.

To access timed passes visit nmaahc.si.edu/passes or call 844-750-3012.

About the National Museum of African American History and Culture  

            The National Museum of African American History and Culture has welcomed more than 4.5 million visitors since opening Sept. 24, 2016, on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Occupying a prominent location next to the Washington Monument, the nearly 400,000-square-foot museum is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive cultural destination devoted exclusively to exploring, documenting and showcasing the African American story and its impact on American and world history. For more information about the museum, visit nmaahc.si.edu, follow @NMAAHC on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat—or call Smithsonian information at (202) 633-1000.

Museum Merchandise Monday: Lucy Craft Laney Museum and Conference Center

This #MuseumMerchandiseMonday is dedicated to Augusta, Georgia’s Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History & Conference Center. Pictured are a couple pages from the museum’s activity & coloring book.

The small house museum opened in 1991 and is the only African American museum in the Central Savannah River Area. It is located in the Historic Laney-Walker District and promotes “the legacy of Miss Lucy Craft Laney through art, history and the preservation of her home.” Miss Laney started the first kindergarten class for black children in Augusta and founded the Lamar School of Nursing for black women.

Also pictured in this post are images of promotional material for past exhibitions held at the museum and conference center.

Current events and other information can be found on the museum’s website Lucycraftlaneymuseum.com or by calling 706-724-3576.

Field notes — “Black Metropolis: 30 Years of Afrofuturism”

Opening night of “Black Metropolis: 30 Years of Afrofuturism, Comics, Music, Animation, Decapitated Chickens, Heroes, Villains and Negroes” took place at the Hammonds House Museum on Friday October 12, 2018. That evening Afrofuturist and visual artist, Tim Fielder, engaged in an artist talk.

Pictured above are a few notes taken during Tim Fielder’s artist talk. I will get back to this shortly, but first I want to offer a few thoughts developed after examining the Black Metropolis exhibit.

In the brochure pictured on the right, Tim Fielder provides an exhibit manifesto. He describes BLACK METROPOLIS as an “emotional ideal, not necessarily the physical construct…where Black people can be anything or anyone they choose.”

Fielder has developed a series of Black sci-fi superheroes to convey stories of empowerment or as Fielder expressed in his artist talk – “BLACK Ben Hurs”. Fielder considers himself an afroturism visual artist. His graphic designs and excerpts from his written work are currently on display at the Hammonds House Museum.

For me, the most interesting part of the exhibit is the context described on the exhibit labels. Fielder describes the highs and lows of his career. Examples of this includes the time he produced visuals and a story for the now defunct Marvel Music. Dr. Dre: Man With a Cold Heart featured rap pioneer Dr. Dre. When Marvel Comics declared bankruptcy the material was never published. Luckily, visitors can view this work at the Hammonds House museum.

Tim Fielder completed studies in New York at The School of Visual Arts. During that time he worked as a freelance editorial cartoonist for Village Voice. He also produced promotional material for entertainment venues.

A booklet titled Death Comes in Fours hangs near the “Alternative Cartooning” exhibit label. The last few pages are dedicated to advertisements. There you will see that members of the Fielder family once had a business operation in Georgia’s South DeKalb Mall.

Death Comes in Fours features characters inspired by Yoruba diety.

BLACK METROPOLIS exhibits 30 years of Tim Fielder’s work. In many ways, Fielder’s artist talk was something like an Afrofuturism 101. Below are a few notes taken during that discussion:

  • Terminology used within the Afrofuturism community include “DieselFunk” and “SteamFunk”
  • Tim Fielder and his brother Jim have a “Glog” which is similar to a video blog but with graphics. Diesel Funk
  • Tim suggests Octavia Butler’s “Wildseed” as a go-to book for first time science fiction readers
  • Octavia Butler, a black woman, was the first sci-fi writer to win a MacArthur Fellowship
  • Octavia Butler and others are featured in a documentary entitled “Black Sci-Fi”
  • Pedro Bell produced Afrofuturistic styled album covers for George Clinton and Funkadelic
  • Tim Fielder feels LaBelle, Brothers Johnson, Earth Wind and Fire embodied Afrofuturism – Sun-RA? Not so much.
  • Janelle Monae recently talked about Afrofuturism on Stephen Colbert. That’s major!
  • Ryan Coogler and his work on Black Panther has influenced financial opportunities for afrofuturism visual artists
  • Netflix has democratized how film media is manufactured, published and consumed. Creating a greater opportunity for visual artists to get their work out there.
  • Tim Fielder was a guest on the Afrofuturist podcast. Although I do not see where that episode has been uploaded, check out this interview with Nyame Brown. Brown does a great job of contextualizing what Afrofuturism is and what it can be.

Field notes and review prepared by TheHistorian528 for The Merging Lane Project

(Atlanta) Madam C.J. Walker Museum

Madame C.J. Walker Beauty Shoppe Museum/WERD Studio – 54 Hilliard Street Atlanta Georgia

Established in 2000, this site was once home to a Madame CJ Walker beauty shoppe and the first Black owned radio station. Today, the space functions as a museum and a beauty shop

404-518-2887 and madamemuseum@gmail.com for more information and to book your tour, today.

Field Notes: Geronimo Collins in New Orleans (coming soon)

A friend of The Merging Lanes Project, Geronimo Knows, is down in New Orleans. He’ll be sending us a few notes on the black historic sites he’s visited while there.

His field notes will be posted here and on instagram.com/TheMergingLanesProject

Museum Merchandise Monday! Louis Armstrong House Museum

Museum Merchandise Monday—a day to highlight favorite gifts found at museum and historic site, gift shops.

Pictured is a t-shirt purchased during a 2014 visit to the Louis Armstrong House Museum. Located at 34-56 107th Street Queens, New York.

“The Louis Armstrong House Museum sustains and promotes the cultural, historical, and humanitarian legacy of Louis Armstrong by preserving and interpreting Armstrong’s house and grounds, collecting and sharing archival materials that document Armstrong’s life and legacy, and presenting public programs such as exhibits, concerts, lectures, and film screenings.”

Join us! Use hashtag #MuseumMerchandiseMonday

and tag us in your pics