(Atlanta) “With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith”

5 pictures captured while exploring “With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith” at Atlanta’s High Museum of Art.

The entire exhibition is housed in 4 rooms. Images 1-4 were photographed in the temporary exhibit room labeled the Tommie Smith Archives. Tommie Smith and wife Delois, are said to have amassed and archived thousands of artifacts related to his life and career. The High Museum currently has on display a selection of photographs, news clippings, awards, and other material culture.

The Tommie Smith Archives is dedicated to artifacts while the rest of the exhibit features the work of conceptual artist, Glenn Kaino. Each of Kaino’s designs are inspired by Tommie Smith, the living legend.

Image 1: commemorative item from 1968 Mexico City Olympics.

Image 2: Published letter written by Shirley Graham DuBois, addressed to Tommie Smith. Mrs. DuBois was the wife of W.E.B. DuBois. The letter was printed with her permission in a publication entitled The Black Panther.

Image 3: Track and Field equipment.

Image 4: Tommie Smith achieving a world record title during his time at San Jose State University.

Image 5: The Bridge a conceptual piece created by Glenn Kaino. The 100 foot serpentine bridge is comprised of gold painted casts of Tommie Smith’s arm. There is a great amount of symbolism in this piece including it representing a “path connected to the past that leads forward to the present.”

Atlanta Trip to St. Helena Island, South Carolina’s Penn Center

A few photographs from last weekend’s trip to St. Helena Island, South Carolina. The island has been home to the Penn Center (originally Penn School) since 1862. The Penn Center hosted their 36th Annual Heritage Days Celebration November 8 – November 11, 2018.

The 1954-1968 Civil Rights Movement, Abolitionism, U.S. Civil War, and Gullah-Geechee Heritage can all be examined through the lens of the Penn Center. Book title “Penn Center: A History Preserved” is a good way to learn about the history that has taken place at and around the cultural institution.

With Drawn Arms: High Museum of Art, Atlanta

[photo courtesy of the Kavi Gupta Gallery/Glenn Kaino/High Museum of Art]

Visiting Atlanta’s High Museum of Art, next week. Going to check out “With Drawn Arms”

The temporary exhibit will be on view until February 3rd, 2019.

Have you seen it yet? Share your thoughts.

Museum Merchandise Monday: Lucy Craft Laney Museum and Conference Center

This #MuseumMerchandiseMonday is dedicated to Augusta, Georgia’s Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History & Conference Center. Pictured are a couple pages from the museum’s activity & coloring book.

The small house museum opened in 1991 and is the only African American museum in the Central Savannah River Area. It is located in the Historic Laney-Walker District and promotes “the legacy of Miss Lucy Craft Laney through art, history and the preservation of her home.” Miss Laney started the first kindergarten class for black children in Augusta and founded the Lamar School of Nursing for black women.

Also pictured in this post are images of promotional material for past exhibitions held at the museum and conference center.

Current events and other information can be found on the museum’s website Lucycraftlaneymuseum.com or by calling 706-724-3576.

Wil Haygood Guest Curates Harlem Renaissance at 100 Exhibit

(Schools Out, 1936. Allan Rohan Crite. Oil on Canvas. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Ralph Deluca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Ralph Deluca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Jumping Jive, 1942. Norman Lewis. Oil on canvas. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Type Study, II – Two Public School Teachers, 1925. Winold Reiss. Pastel on Whatman Board. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Harlem Girl, 1925. Winold Reiss. Pencil, charcoal and pastels on heavy illustration board. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Gamin, 1930. Augusta Savage. Painted Plaster. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

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(I, Too, Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100 writer and exhibition curator, Wil Haygood. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

Familiar with the motion picture The Butler? Acclaimed writer, Wil Haygood, authored the book that was turned into the award-winning movie.

In 2015, Columbus Museum of Art Executive Director Nannette V. Maciejunes invited Haygood, a Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, to curate an exhibition for the 100th anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance. This resulted in an exhibition and accompanying 250-page catalogue written by Haygood, entitled I, Too, Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100.

Haygood grew up in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio and was a reporter for both the Boston Globe and the Washington Post. He has written books on notable subjects including Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, and Sugar Ray Robinson. As guest curator for the exhibit and supplementary book, Haygood researched and selected a series of “paintings, prints, sculpture, contemporary documents and ephemera” to illustrate “multiple facets of the era” and the “lives of its people, the art, literature, music, and social history.”

The works of Allen Rohan Crite, Romare Bearden, and Augusta Savage are included in the exhibition. The exhibition is open to the public at the Columbus Museum of Art, now through January 20, 2019.

Click link to .PDF version of 250-page Catalogue, below:

I,Too, Sing America book

 

Log onto cbusharlem100.com for a listing of Columbus, Ohio events that celebrate the Harlem Renaissance at 100

Smithsonian African American Film Festival Will Display Black Panther Costume for First Time

[photo source: Collection of The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Marvel Studios and The Walt Disney Company. Photographer: Matt Kennedy for Marvel]

The Black Panther’s hero costume worn by Chadwick Boseman will go on display for the first time during the inaugural Smithsonian African American Film Festival’s “Night at the Museum” celebration Thursday October 25, 2018.

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture has acquired several objects from the film Black Panther, including the costume worn by actor Chadwick Boseman, 24 high-resolution production photographs, and a shooting script signed by co-writer and director Ryan Coogler.

The objects were acquired when the museum’s Earl W. & Amanda Stafford Center for African American Media Arts hosted a public screening of the film in February 2018.

Tickets to the festival and “Night at the Museum” can be purchased at http://aafilmfest.si.edu

(Field Notes) Geronimo Knows: Louis Armstrong Park

#fieldnotes and photographs from @geronimoknows

Louis ”Satchmo” Armstrong is New Orleans’ most famous son. The legendary trumpeter was born 117 years ago in a section of the city once known as The Battlefield. Thick skin and heart were a prerequisite to survive there, but the challenges of Armstrong’s youth greatly added to the vibrancy of his music

Pictured is the gate to Louis Armstrong Park which sits on N. Rampart Street. A grand sight to see during the day or night. You’ll always find residents and tourists stopping to take photos in front of the archway.