(Atlanta) Street Name Changes: John Wesley Dobbs

Doing a bit of research on street name changes, here’s an example || On August 16, 1993 Atlanta City Council approved Ordinance Number 93-0-1140 resulting in “Renaming Houston Street in its entirety to John Wesley Dobbs Avenue and for other purposes”

Image 1: John Wesley Dobbs Ave and Jackson Street NE

Image 2: full record of city ordinance which notes “John Wesley Dobbs was a champion of African American business and Civil Rights in Atlanta and the Nation.”

Image 3: City Council votes on ordinance.

Image 4: Notice of a public hearing listed in the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

John Wesley Dobbs (1881-1962) is Maynard Jackson’s (1938-2003) maternal grandfather. Jackson was the mayor of Atlanta when the ordinance was signed and the street renamed in his grandfather’s honor.

[source: ordinance records on file at Kenan Research Center]

(Field Notes) Geronimo Knows: Louis Armstrong Park

#fieldnotes and photographs from @geronimoknows

Louis ”Satchmo” Armstrong is New Orleans’ most famous son. The legendary trumpeter was born 117 years ago in a section of the city once known as The Battlefield. Thick skin and heart were a prerequisite to survive there, but the challenges of Armstrong’s youth greatly added to the vibrancy of his music

Pictured is the gate to Louis Armstrong Park which sits on N. Rampart Street. A grand sight to see during the day or night. You’ll always find residents and tourists stopping to take photos in front of the archway.

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center (part 1 of 2)

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Photo by Sophia V. Nelson/The Merging Lanes Project

Meet Mary Dennard-Turner, part of the Maryland Park Service staff at the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center located in Church Creek (Dorchester County) Maryland.

An area native. For several years she has been an active member of the local heritage preservation society. She was retired when the Maryland Park Service approached her to work as a greeter at the visitor center. She said when she retired as a corrections officer she told herself she’d never wear another uniform again. Yet, there she was, complemented by that beautiful white, green and red Maryland Park Service seal; one of the first faces to greet a few groups and I when we entered the visitor center on Tuesday.

She shared she had just crossed over the 1 year mark as a seasonal employee and is enjoying herself.

More on the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center to come.