(Atlanta) Madam C.J. Walker Museum

Madame C.J. Walker Beauty Shoppe Museum/WERD Studio – 54 Hilliard Street Atlanta Georgia

Established in 2000, this site was once home to a Madame CJ Walker beauty shoppe and the first Black owned radio station. Today, the space functions as a museum and a beauty shop

404-518-2887 and madamemuseum@gmail.com for more information and to book your tour, today.

Found at UGA Archives: “Ante-Bellum Slave Quarters Still Stand Near Atlanta”

Found this article at the University of Georgia Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Library, yesterday. It is titled “Ante-Bellum Slave Quarters Still Stand Near Atlanta.” It references a row of six one room brick houses located at the intersection of Ben Hill and Washington Road in East Point, Georgia. Journalist, Boyd Taylor, wrote that the homes were still occupied by descendants of the original inhabitants (this article was likely written around the early 1940s).

Taylor described the area as a “scenic surprise” for motorists, with the potential to hear a strumming of a guitar and the hum of a melodic spiritual on a summer night. Quaint, old houses with stucco walls

A few thoughts:

1. This article was written to attract white motorists to the area. Taylor’s description “the quiet village still stands as much as it did in the distant more romantic days before the war” proves that

2. Boyd Taylor, the paper’s Automotive Editor, authored this story

3. In 1941 Boyd Taylor received a $3000 loan from Margaret Mitchell to preserve and turn into a museum, Atlanta’s famed historic home, the Margaret Mitchell House

4. Does any part of the referenced “slave quarters” remain in the East Point community today?

5. Are there any historic markers interpreting the history of the Connally Plantation and the slave quarters referenced in this article?

Thoughts? Corrections? Please share.

Unveiling of John Lewis Freedom Parkway and John Lewis Plaza Additions

Representative John Lewis pictured alongside (L-R) Atlanta City Council member Andre Dickens, Mayor Keisha Bottoms, media and others.
John Lewis Parkway Part I, before the unveiling.
John Lewis Parkway Part II, after the unveiling.
Atlanta Department of Public Works employees after placing their final touch on park grounds.
Clark Atlanta University Band Drum Major
Clark Atlanta University Band filing into John Lewis Freedom Plaza, site of the day’s ceremony.
Young children with caregivers as all await John Lewis’ scheduled 1 pm arrival.
Guidance on how to best use the latest addition, the John Lewis Ride to Freedom Play Space.
pictured is one of several civil rights regions featured along the Ride to Freedom Play Space. According to Monica Prothro additional signage will be installed before the end of the year. The signage will interpret civil rights history in various regions across the U.S.
“The Unveiling: John Lewis Freedom Parkway” program guide.

There were probably over a couple hundred people that came out to witness the definition of a significant moment in Atlanta history. The date, August 22nd 2018. Location, John Lewis Freedom Parkway and the corner of Ponce De Leon Ave NE. The occasion? Well, just a short time ago John Lewis Freedom Parkway was known as simply Freedom Parkway. But, in early December 2017 a resolution sponsored by Council member Andre Dickens, that called for a street name change from Freedom Parkway to John Lewis Freedom Parkway, was approved by Atlanta City Council. Following the approval, months of preparation went into changing the street name with a public, conspicuous display of admiration in Lewis’ honor. Also of note are changes in the process of being made to the existing John Lewis Plaza.

To start, imagine this —in comes one of the most notable Freedom Riders, John Lewis, on a MARTA bus designated for him, his family members, and other close supporters. With streets partially blocked, ushered in by a crew of public safety officers, the bus turns the corner… in it is Lewis and his selected bus passengers with their eyes locked on the crowd. From the MARTA bus windows they are getting their first glimpse of the amount of people that amassed to witness “the unveiling”.

Fast forward to Lewis exiting the bus. He was met by many who must have felt it was important to document that very moment in time. Whether it was a mobile phone or another digital recording device, more than not someone was working to capture an affecting image. Lewis worked his way from one end of the park to the other, surrounded by a crowd that could be described as a swarm (Note: I am curious to know if Representative Lewis felt any other way besides “in his element” while making his way alongside the crowd to the other end of the park). Just before reaching the main stage, accompanied by Councilmember Andre Dickens and Mayor Keisha Bottoms, Lewis was welcomed by the Clark Atlanta University (CAU) Band. The band performed a series of routines just as they did while the crowd awaited Lewis’ 1 pm arrival. Once the crowd settled, Dickens introduced the John Lewis Freedom Parkway task force members, other dignitaries, Mayor Keisha Bottoms, and finally John Lewis. Dickens shared that there was a connection between John Lewis and Freedom Parkway due to Lewis’ career long commitment to civil rights. Dickens shared that Freedom Parkway and Ponce De Leon Ave were the selected cross streets not just because of the original street name but also because the section remains the only highway in Atlanta that is solely a green space, void of business infrastructure.

Additionally, new features added to the already existing John Lewis Plaza, were unveiled. With the support of KaBoom, a children’s health awareness organization, the city was able to make upgrades to the park area. These changes were inspired by Lewis’ career in Civil Rights and public service, as well as his graphic novels, the Mark trilogy. Monica Prothro, Art Program Manager with the City of Atlanta shared that the Freedom Play Space is nearing completion. Additional interpretive signage and a bus honoring the Freedom Riders will be installed before year’s end.

John Lewis Freedom Parkway and additions to John Lewis Plaza are just two public spaces in Atlanta, named in honor of Representative John Lewis. During his speech, Lewis shared that he is personally championing a day when the human race can achieve solidarity. It is likely Lewis’ career long track record of working to fulfill such an ideal that has resulted in the City of Atlanta commitment to honoring his name and legacy. If you are interested in visiting a public space in Atlanta to connect with American, African American, and Civil Rights history know that John Lewis Plaza located at the corner of the newly renamed John Lewis Freedom Parkway and Ponce De Leon Northeast, is a good place to do so.

Carver Village: Seeking National Register of Historic Places Designation

Follow Us on Instagram: @TheMergingLanesProject

In 2016 I documented residents in Savannah Georgia’s Carver Village to find out why they felt it important to have their residential neighborhood placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Since then, Georgia Department of Natural Resources (Historic Preservation Division) has determined that Carver Village does have national significance. The community has been placed on both the Georgia State Register of Historic Places and the National Register of Historic Places.

Atlanta’s APEX Museum – 40 Years and Still Going Strong

2018 marks the 40th Year Anniversary of Atlanta’s APEX (African-American Panoramic Experience) Museum

In early January, Daniel Moore, Sr. spent time sharing the experience he has had operating the APEX Museum since 1978.

Soundcloud Interview Highlights Include:

  • Why he founded the APEX Museum
  • How he has been able to sustain a career operating the APEX Museum
  • The types of exhibits the museum rotates
  • The social impact the museum has had on the local and African American community as a whole

 

Support Your Museum Gift Shop! – Hammonds House Museum

“it is a way for the facility to generate money. It also opens up the market and creates visibility for independent artists.” -Wendall Hurst, Hammonds House Museum, Atlanta GA

What are your favorite gift shop finds? Share in the comments