(Atlanta) “With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith”

5 pictures captured while exploring “With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith” at Atlanta’s High Museum of Art.

The entire exhibition is housed in 4 rooms. Images 1-4 were photographed in the temporary exhibit room labeled the Tommie Smith Archives. Tommie Smith and wife Delois, are said to have amassed and archived thousands of artifacts related to his life and career. The High Museum currently has on display a selection of photographs, news clippings, awards, and other material culture.

The Tommie Smith Archives is dedicated to artifacts while the rest of the exhibit features the work of conceptual artist, Glenn Kaino. Each of Kaino’s designs are inspired by Tommie Smith, the living legend.

Image 1: commemorative item from 1968 Mexico City Olympics.

Image 2: Published letter written by Shirley Graham DuBois, addressed to Tommie Smith. Mrs. DuBois was the wife of W.E.B. DuBois. The letter was printed with her permission in a publication entitled The Black Panther.

Image 3: Track and Field equipment.

Image 4: Tommie Smith achieving a world record title during his time at San Jose State University.

Image 5: The Bridge a conceptual piece created by Glenn Kaino. The 100 foot serpentine bridge is comprised of gold painted casts of Tommie Smith’s arm. There is a great amount of symbolism in this piece including it representing a “path connected to the past that leads forward to the present.”

Museum Merchandise Monday: Lucy Craft Laney Museum and Conference Center

This #MuseumMerchandiseMonday is dedicated to Augusta, Georgia’s Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History & Conference Center. Pictured are a couple pages from the museum’s activity & coloring book.

The small house museum opened in 1991 and is the only African American museum in the Central Savannah River Area. It is located in the Historic Laney-Walker District and promotes “the legacy of Miss Lucy Craft Laney through art, history and the preservation of her home.” Miss Laney started the first kindergarten class for black children in Augusta and founded the Lamar School of Nursing for black women.

Also pictured in this post are images of promotional material for past exhibitions held at the museum and conference center.

Current events and other information can be found on the museum’s website Lucycraftlaneymuseum.com or by calling 706-724-3576.

(Atlanta) Madam C.J. Walker Museum

Madame C.J. Walker Beauty Shoppe Museum/WERD Studio – 54 Hilliard Street Atlanta Georgia

Established in 2000, this site was once home to a Madame CJ Walker beauty shoppe and the first Black owned radio station. Today, the space functions as a museum and a beauty shop

404-518-2887 and madamemuseum@gmail.com for more information and to book your tour, today.

Field Notes: Geronimo Collins in New Orleans (coming soon)

A friend of The Merging Lanes Project, Geronimo Knows, is down in New Orleans. He’ll be sending us a few notes on the black historic sites he’s visited while there.

His field notes will be posted here and on instagram.com/TheMergingLanesProject

Found at UGA Archives: “Ante-Bellum Slave Quarters Still Stand Near Atlanta”

Found this article at the University of Georgia Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Library, yesterday. It is titled “Ante-Bellum Slave Quarters Still Stand Near Atlanta.” It references a row of six one room brick houses located at the intersection of Ben Hill and Washington Road in East Point, Georgia. Journalist, Boyd Taylor, wrote that the homes were still occupied by descendants of the original inhabitants (this article was likely written around the early 1940s).

Taylor described the area as a “scenic surprise” for motorists, with the potential to hear a strumming of a guitar and the hum of a melodic spiritual on a summer night. Quaint, old houses with stucco walls

A few thoughts:

1. This article was written to attract white motorists to the area. Taylor’s description “the quiet village still stands as much as it did in the distant more romantic days before the war” proves that

2. Boyd Taylor, the paper’s Automotive Editor, authored this story

3. In 1941 Boyd Taylor received a $3000 loan from Margaret Mitchell to preserve and turn into a museum, Atlanta’s famed historic home, the Margaret Mitchell House

4. Does any part of the referenced “slave quarters” remain in the East Point community today?

5. Are there any historic markers interpreting the history of the Connally Plantation and the slave quarters referenced in this article?

Thoughts? Corrections? Please share.