(Atlanta) “With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith”

5 pictures captured while exploring “With Drawn Arms: Glenn Kaino and Tommie Smith” at Atlanta’s High Museum of Art.

The entire exhibition is housed in 4 rooms. Images 1-4 were photographed in the temporary exhibit room labeled the Tommie Smith Archives. Tommie Smith and wife Delois, are said to have amassed and archived thousands of artifacts related to his life and career. The High Museum currently has on display a selection of photographs, news clippings, awards, and other material culture.

The Tommie Smith Archives is dedicated to artifacts while the rest of the exhibit features the work of conceptual artist, Glenn Kaino. Each of Kaino’s designs are inspired by Tommie Smith, the living legend.

Image 1: commemorative item from 1968 Mexico City Olympics.

Image 2: Published letter written by Shirley Graham DuBois, addressed to Tommie Smith. Mrs. DuBois was the wife of W.E.B. DuBois. The letter was printed with her permission in a publication entitled The Black Panther.

Image 3: Track and Field equipment.

Image 4: Tommie Smith achieving a world record title during his time at San Jose State University.

Image 5: The Bridge a conceptual piece created by Glenn Kaino. The 100 foot serpentine bridge is comprised of gold painted casts of Tommie Smith’s arm. There is a great amount of symbolism in this piece including it representing a “path connected to the past that leads forward to the present.”

Wil Haygood Guest Curates Harlem Renaissance at 100 Exhibit

(Schools Out, 1936. Allan Rohan Crite. Oil on Canvas. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Ralph Deluca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Ralph Deluca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Jumping Jive, 1942. Norman Lewis. Oil on canvas. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Type Study, II – Two Public School Teachers, 1925. Winold Reiss. Pastel on Whatman Board. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Harlem Girl, 1925. Winold Reiss. Pencil, charcoal and pastels on heavy illustration board. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Gamin, 1930. Augusta Savage. Painted Plaster. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

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(I, Too, Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100 writer and exhibition curator, Wil Haygood. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

Familiar with the motion picture The Butler? Acclaimed writer, Wil Haygood, authored the book that was turned into the award-winning movie.

In 2015, Columbus Museum of Art Executive Director Nannette V. Maciejunes invited Haygood, a Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, to curate an exhibition for the 100th anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance. This resulted in an exhibition and accompanying 250-page catalogue written by Haygood, entitled I, Too, Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100.

Haygood grew up in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio and was a reporter for both the Boston Globe and the Washington Post. He has written books on notable subjects including Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, and Sugar Ray Robinson. As guest curator for the exhibit and supplementary book, Haygood researched and selected a series of “paintings, prints, sculpture, contemporary documents and ephemera” to illustrate “multiple facets of the era” and the “lives of its people, the art, literature, music, and social history.”

The works of Allen Rohan Crite, Romare Bearden, and Augusta Savage are included in the exhibition. The exhibition is open to the public at the Columbus Museum of Art, now through January 20, 2019.

Click link to .PDF version of 250-page Catalogue, below:

I,Too, Sing America book

 

Log onto cbusharlem100.com for a listing of Columbus, Ohio events that celebrate the Harlem Renaissance at 100

(Field Notes) Geronimo Knows: Louis Armstrong Park

#fieldnotes and photographs from @geronimoknows

Louis ”Satchmo” Armstrong is New Orleans’ most famous son. The legendary trumpeter was born 117 years ago in a section of the city once known as The Battlefield. Thick skin and heart were a prerequisite to survive there, but the challenges of Armstrong’s youth greatly added to the vibrancy of his music

Pictured is the gate to Louis Armstrong Park which sits on N. Rampart Street. A grand sight to see during the day or night. You’ll always find residents and tourists stopping to take photos in front of the archway.

Found at UGA Archives: “Ante-Bellum Slave Quarters Still Stand Near Atlanta”

Found this article at the University of Georgia Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Library, yesterday. It is titled “Ante-Bellum Slave Quarters Still Stand Near Atlanta.” It references a row of six one room brick houses located at the intersection of Ben Hill and Washington Road in East Point, Georgia. Journalist, Boyd Taylor, wrote that the homes were still occupied by descendants of the original inhabitants (this article was likely written around the early 1940s).

Taylor described the area as a “scenic surprise” for motorists, with the potential to hear a strumming of a guitar and the hum of a melodic spiritual on a summer night. Quaint, old houses with stucco walls

A few thoughts:

1. This article was written to attract white motorists to the area. Taylor’s description “the quiet village still stands as much as it did in the distant more romantic days before the war” proves that

2. Boyd Taylor, the paper’s Automotive Editor, authored this story

3. In 1941 Boyd Taylor received a $3000 loan from Margaret Mitchell to preserve and turn into a museum, Atlanta’s famed historic home, the Margaret Mitchell House

4. Does any part of the referenced “slave quarters” remain in the East Point community today?

5. Are there any historic markers interpreting the history of the Connally Plantation and the slave quarters referenced in this article?

Thoughts? Corrections? Please share.

Businessman and Philanthropist, Dr. William Pickard, to Sponsor Event to Benefit Detroit’s Charles H. Wright Museum and the Motown Museum Project

Dr. William P.

Adapted from Michigan Chronicle Feature Thank You Detroit: Pickard Picks Detroit…again

Businessman and philanthropist, Dr. William Packard, is sponsoring the first “Thank You Detroit” event which will take place this weekend, June 22nd – 24th.

Packard established himself as a McDonald’s franchisee 47-years ago, becoming one of the first African-Americans to do so. Packard is no stranger to philanthropy, having donated $1 million to the National Museum of African-American History and Culture and a host of other education and cultural institutions. This time, Packard will give back to a community he has called his home for nearly 50 years – Detroit.

The “Thank You Detroit” weekend includes an appreciation picnic for current and past employees of Pickard’s McDonald’s franchises; a black-tie gala featuring the Four Tops; and the awarding of two individual $1 million gifts to the Charles H. Wright Museum and the Motown Historical Museum expansion project.

Michael Rosato’s Cambridge (Maryland) African American Heritage Mural

The African American Heritage Mural is located at the corner of Maryland Avenue and Route 50 in Cambridge, Maryland. 

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Oooo I didn’t plan to capture this beauty today. I saw photos of it about a year ago, circulating online after its unveiling. But when it appeared to the right of me as I was driving by, I just had to pull over || Here is a description found on muralist, Michael Rosato’s website: “A mural highlighting Cambridge, Maryland’s rich African-American history, culture and heritage, particularly in the community around Pine Street, which is one of the oldest African-American communities in the country that dates back to the mid-1800s. Acrylic on board || I plan to look up the history of Pine Street. …Hey! There’s my girl Gloria Richardson !!in the yellow dress. Read about her while taking an African American history class at Georgia State University. It amazed me how Richardson was instrumental in a civil rights movement that spilled over into small town Maryland during the 1960s. I included Image 4, to give you a bit of context. Many are familiar with that picture of Richardson ~ “The Historian”

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Podcast – “The Promise: Life, Death, and Change in the Projects”

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Photo by Joel Buglewickz

Adapted from New Yorker Magazine Article

“The Promise: Life, Death, and Change in the Projects”

Reporter Meribah Knight has produced a six-part series podcast on Nashville, Tennessee’s public housing development, James A. Cayce Homes. This story follows the razing and redevelopment stages of Cayce Homes. Knight described yearly household incomes of Cayce’s original residents as being somewhere around $8000 per year.

Redevelopers have coined the revitalization project “Envison Cayce” and the podcast “The Promise” gives an inside look at the enthusiasm and skepticism felt by Cayce’s longtime residents. After the razing of Cayce Homes’ original structures, the contemporary version welcomes a diversified community consisting of young professionals, while giving those who’ve been there for years the choice to remain. Only this choice comes with a no pet policy, at least 50+ security cameras, and “nowhere to sit outside and talk”

Pictured is Big Man, one of the podcast’s interviewees. A longtime resident of James A. Cayce Homes, he signed on to remain in the community to see if the revitalized “Envision Cayce” housing development will turn out to be the imagined safe place for him and his family to live.

[source: Sarah Larson, New Yorker Magazine]