(Riceboro, GA) Sugar Cane Harvest

Footage collected on November 24th, 2018 at the 14th Annual Geechee Kunda Sugar Cane Harvest. The event was held at the Geechee Kunda Cultural Center located in Riceboro, Georgia.

Dr. Jamal Amir Toure, cultural historian, community leader and professor at Savannah State University emceed the event.

Riceboro was established between 1756 – 1757 and was named “for the early rice industry in the area.” Enslaved persons in the area were subjected to labor on rice plantations.

Geechee Kunda Cultural Center was founded in 2000 by Jim and Pat Bacote.

video clip contains field recordings collected during the 14th Annual Sugar Cane Harvest juxtaposed with photographs found in the Geechee Kunda Museum.

Visit GeecheeKunda.com for museum hours and event listing.

 

National Museum of African American History and Culture Announces “Walk-Up Weekdays” January & February

image001

 

National Museum of African American History and Culture Announces 
Walk-Up Weekdays in January and February

            The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture has announced Walk-Up Weekdays in January and February. Individuals may enter the museum on a first-come, first-served basis Monday through Friday for the months of January and February 2019. Timed-entry passes for individuals will only be required on Saturdays and Sundays. Walk-up entry on weekdays is a as part of a continuing pilot to provide visitors unfettered access to the museum.

On Wednesday, Nov. 7, at 9 a.m. ET, the museum will distribute advance timed-entry passes for Saturdays and Sundays Feb. 2 and 3, 9 and 10, 16 and 17 and 23 and 24. Walk-Up Weekdays will continue in February 2019 and timed passes will not be distributed for weekdays (Mondays–Fridays). Individuals may enter the museum on a first-come, first-served basis on weekdays in February. Same-day online and walk-up passes will not be available nor necessary on weekdays in February. Group passes are required every day for groups of 10 or more. Timed passes for January have already been distributed and will be required only on Saturdays and Sundays in January.

Timed passes for every day in November and December have already been distributed. The options for visitors are same-day online passes and walk-up passes that will be available most afternoons in November and December.

To access timed passes visit nmaahc.si.edu/passes or call 844-750-3012.

About the National Museum of African American History and Culture  

            The National Museum of African American History and Culture has welcomed more than 4.5 million visitors since opening Sept. 24, 2016, on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Occupying a prominent location next to the Washington Monument, the nearly 400,000-square-foot museum is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive cultural destination devoted exclusively to exploring, documenting and showcasing the African American story and its impact on American and world history. For more information about the museum, visit nmaahc.si.edu, follow @NMAAHC on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat—or call Smithsonian information at (202) 633-1000.

Wil Haygood Guest Curates Harlem Renaissance at 100 Exhibit

(Schools Out, 1936. Allan Rohan Crite. Oil on Canvas. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Ralph Deluca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Ralph Deluca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Jumping Jive, 1942. Norman Lewis. Oil on canvas. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Type Study, II – Two Public School Teachers, 1925. Winold Reiss. Pastel on Whatman Board. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Harlem Girl, 1925. Winold Reiss. Pencil, charcoal and pastels on heavy illustration board. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Gamin, 1930. Augusta Savage. Painted Plaster. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

img_1464
(I, Too, Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100 writer and exhibition curator, Wil Haygood. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

Familiar with the motion picture The Butler? Acclaimed writer, Wil Haygood, authored the book that was turned into the award-winning movie.

In 2015, Columbus Museum of Art Executive Director Nannette V. Maciejunes invited Haygood, a Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, to curate an exhibition for the 100th anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance. This resulted in an exhibition and accompanying 250-page catalogue written by Haygood, entitled I, Too, Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100.

Haygood grew up in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio and was a reporter for both the Boston Globe and the Washington Post. He has written books on notable subjects including Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, and Sugar Ray Robinson. As guest curator for the exhibit and supplementary book, Haygood researched and selected a series of “paintings, prints, sculpture, contemporary documents and ephemera” to illustrate “multiple facets of the era” and the “lives of its people, the art, literature, music, and social history.”

The works of Allen Rohan Crite, Romare Bearden, and Augusta Savage are included in the exhibition. The exhibition is open to the public at the Columbus Museum of Art, now through January 20, 2019.

Click link to .PDF version of 250-page Catalogue, below:

I,Too, Sing America book

 

Log onto cbusharlem100.com for a listing of Columbus, Ohio events that celebrate the Harlem Renaissance at 100

For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics (discussion and book signing)

The power women in this image were at The King Center on Tuesday October 9. The four engaged in a discussion with retired news-anchor and radio personality, Monica Pearson, about their career and book entitled, “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics”

A quote from Sean Combs: When I launched the ‘Vote or Die’ campaign, I knew I needed to have the Colored Girls’ advice and knowledge…”

I am currently working my way through the pages of my signed copy. So far, one of the more intriguing stories is that of a young Donna Brazile’s role in helping Coretta Scott King establish the King Holiday in 1983. Guess who questioned why Mrs. King would recruit a young, inexperienced professional to be involved with such an important cause? According to Brazile, Eleanor Holmes Norton did. But in the end Brazile and Norton grew to respect each other. Brazile even helped with Norton’s campaign efforts.