Wil Haygood Guest Curates Harlem Renaissance at 100 Exhibit

(Schools Out, 1936. Allan Rohan Crite. Oil on Canvas. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Ralph Deluca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Ralph Deluca Collection of African American Vernacular Photography. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Jumping Jive, 1942. Norman Lewis. Oil on canvas. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Type Study, II – Two Public School Teachers, 1925. Winold Reiss. Pastel on Whatman Board. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Harlem Girl, 1925. Winold Reiss. Pencil, charcoal and pastels on heavy illustration board. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

(Gamin, 1930. Augusta Savage. Painted Plaster. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

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(I, Too, Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100 writer and exhibition curator, Wil Haygood. Photo courtesy of Columbus Museum of Art)

Familiar with the motion picture The Butler? Acclaimed writer, Wil Haygood, authored the book that was turned into the award-winning movie.

In 2015, Columbus Museum of Art Executive Director Nannette V. Maciejunes invited Haygood, a Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, to curate an exhibition for the 100th anniversary of the Harlem Renaissance. This resulted in an exhibition and accompanying 250-page catalogue written by Haygood, entitled I, Too, Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100.

Haygood grew up in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Columbus, Ohio and was a reporter for both the Boston Globe and the Washington Post. He has written books on notable subjects including Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, and Sugar Ray Robinson. As guest curator for the exhibit and supplementary book, Haygood researched and selected a series of “paintings, prints, sculpture, contemporary documents and ephemera” to illustrate “multiple facets of the era” and the “lives of its people, the art, literature, music, and social history.”

The works of Allen Rohan Crite, Romare Bearden, and Augusta Savage are included in the exhibition. The exhibition is open to the public at the Columbus Museum of Art, now through January 20, 2019.

Click link to .PDF version of 250-page Catalogue, below:

I,Too, Sing America book

 

Log onto cbusharlem100.com for a listing of Columbus, Ohio events that celebrate the Harlem Renaissance at 100

For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics (discussion and book signing)

The power women in this image were at The King Center on Tuesday October 9. The four engaged in a discussion with retired news-anchor and radio personality, Monica Pearson, about their career and book entitled, “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics”

A quote from Sean Combs: When I launched the ‘Vote or Die’ campaign, I knew I needed to have the Colored Girls’ advice and knowledge…”

I am currently working my way through the pages of my signed copy. So far, one of the more intriguing stories is that of a young Donna Brazile’s role in helping Coretta Scott King establish the King Holiday in 1983. Guess who questioned why Mrs. King would recruit a young, inexperienced professional to be involved with such an important cause? According to Brazile, Eleanor Holmes Norton did. But in the end Brazile and Norton grew to respect each other. Brazile even helped with Norton’s campaign efforts.